Browsing: jockey

Get The Race Cards of Upcoming Horse Race Events

For knowing exactly how a horse racing is going on one can view the post data by visiting one of the web sites relating to the race. To know exactly what is happening in the racecourse is quite difficult for the person who is not able to reach there by any reason. Thus with the help of Post data section of any website related to racing one can easily find out all the results of the race.

Singapore Turf Club Results show the related results in the post data section in which a table arrangement of different tabs is there along each other. These tabs moving from left side to right having the title are Racing Home, Stats, Commentary as well as Results, Card, Sports lights. You have to locate the post data over the table and you can get all the information regarding your race card. Thus for your convenience the following references are shown below. It can help you to know about the situation of the game.

A post data contain columns with numbers. These columns are classified into RPR, OR, HORSE, GIONG, DRAW, RECENT FORM, TS, TRAINER FORM, DIST, ABILITY and others. Along with the help of this table you can make the assessment about your ability in comparison to other horses. As well as the table also indicates the visible negatives of your horse. So the following information about the post data section in brief is given below:

This game contains so much fun and mix of the emotions of lose and win. Once you will go through with this game you will realize it overall importance as well as also know the why people are crazy behind this game. Singapore Race Card shows all the results of the races held at the place where you are not able to reach by any condition.

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The Secrets Behinds Happy Horses

Horses thrive on routine and a healthy stress free environment. Keeping their environment and living habits as close to that of their predecessors throughout evolution will help with this.

Turnout

There is a general rule that horses should have about an acre to themselves of field. So if there are 5 horses in a field, the field should be roughly 5 acres. This can not always be the case but it is important not to overcrowd. Many of us do not like to turn out if the ground is wet, worrying the grazing will be ruined so it would be of benefit for an area to be created where horses can be turned out even when wet. Dedicating an area to this, you can put flooring down e.g. bark, enabling turnout whatever the weather.

Exercise

Depending on our own lives sometimes it is not always possible to exercise to the level, or for the amount of time we would like. Particularly when the nights draw in, we can be hindered in our desires to exercise our horses fully. Horse walkers provide safe and effective ways of stretching the horse’s legs while you quickly get on with the other tasks of the day. This is not advised as an alternative to ridden exercise but will help you get the horse out of the stable.

Feed

Natural diets with plenty of forage, providing this makes available all energies needed for your horse’s performance level, can be the simplest and most efficient way of feeding your horse. There is no doubting that when your horse sis lacking in a certain area, that vitamins, supplements etc. can provide just what is needed, but a well thought out natural diet can also do the same. Keeping the fibre intake high, can also help to prevent gastric ulcers and enable optimum digestion, utilising the functionality of the horse’s digestive system.

Saddlery

Well fitted saddles, possibly with the option for interchangeable saddle flaps dependent on the exercise being done are one of the most valuable ways of investing in your riding experience. The horse will move more comfortably beneath you allowing concentration to be on the job at hand rather than controlling a horse evading pain from beneath the saddle. This is the same with all tack, ensure they are fitted correctly and not rubbing in any way. The quality of the equipment used can contribute to this.

Not all gadgets are bad, there is always the potential to over complicate things, but a well-used piece of training equipment can help teach your horse what you require, build up muscle mass and enable quicker development. The Equi-Ami is perfect for building up top line, much more quickly than other lunge aids.

Protective boots are always of benefit when working. There are a range of boots and leg protection for all eventualities, depending on the work you require from your horse.

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Training a Horse to Tolerate Being Clipped

Does your horse object to being clipped? Then this story will probably be familiar to you. This is how we coped with a horse that had almost got to the stage of being unable to be clipped at all!.

When I first got my horse, Jazz, I thought she would cope with anything – she travelled well, was good for the farrier, had great stable manners and wasn’t spooky. Whilst she might have been a challenge to ride, I was congratulating myself on how good her manners were until the winter came and it was time for clipping.

It became obvious very quickly that clippers could not be brought anywhere near her. Ditching the normal clippers we tried a cordless pair which were particularly quiet, and just about managed to give her a rather unique clip, but she was not happy about it at all and it became dangerous to try to do anymore. Luckily her coat grows slowly, so it was another 12 months before we had to try again, and this time she was not having it at all. Even the sight of the clippers got her quite distressed, let alone getting so far as turning them on, so we resorted to sedation. Sleepy, she tolerated it for a bit, but we still didn’t manage to get much more than the neck clipped.

She even showed signs of getting worse – becoming unsettled just because she could hear another horse being clipped in a nearby stable.

So something had to be tried. Each winter she seemed to be getting a thicker coat, and desperately needed clipping as she sweated so much – it wasn’t an option to leave her unless we were going to stop riding. Then, one day, I was reading one of the great books by Mark Rashid, and something he suggested hit a chord with me. He described using a similar method to what we came to call the ‘Drill Treatment’.

It took both my husband, Steve, and myself. For the first session Steve stood well back from the front of the stable and turned on the drill, holding it down by his side. Jazz jumped, and looked uncomfortable, not liking the noise one bit. We kept the drill running for about 10 minutes, with me in the stable stroking her and giving her treats. Then we stopped for the day. After a couple of times she just accepted that humans do strange things, and gradually she calmed down and went back to munching her hay whilst the drill was running.

This process continued. Three or four times a week we’d do the Drill Treatment, gradually moving closer to the stable door and keeping the drill running until she relaxed. At first the progress seemed slow, and we could only move the drill closer by inches but we continued to persevere. The first achievement was the day when we were finally able to take the drill into the stable with her. Bit by bit she got more used to the noise and we were able to move nearer to her. Then, with drill in one hand, Steve stroked her with his other hand until she became settled. And then came the day he was able to actually lay the drill against her side, and mimic the action of the clippers with it. It took about six weeks to get to this stage.

So then, the day of judgement – clipping day. We decided we’d sedate her again, just so she would be relaxed, and then went for it. She was the best she had ever been – neck, stomach and a tiny bit off her back legs. This was a fantastic achievement! We were so proud of her.

The following year we started the drill treatment again, but she was so relaxed with the drill, and so we didn’t have to spend so much time with it. We decided to sedate her again as we didn’t want her distressed but this time she was so relaxed she all but fell asleep during the clipping! We took the opportunity and went for a full clip.

I’m not sure if we’ll get to the stage where we don’t need to use sedation at all, but I truly believe that if we hadn’t persevered with the Drill Treatment, she wouldn’t have been clipped at all these past couple of yeara! If you want to try this method it does take a lot of patience – trying to rush to touch her with it too early would have been a mistake. And it’s useful to have a second person, one to reassure, and one ready to move away with the drill if it’s too close for (her) comfort.

But the proof for us was that it certainly did work, and now she can be ridden all winter without any worries about her being too hot and uncomfortable. She looks very pretty too! She no longer sports a ‘Jazz Special’ clip – otherwise known as the ‘however much you can get off’ clip!

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